Breast Reconstruction

Before and After Pictures of Breast Reconstruction by Dr. LaTrenta

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General Info

Breast reconstruction surgery involves multiple plastic surgery techniques to restore a breast to its normal shape, appearance and size following mastectomy.

Most cases involve implant reconstruction in two stages. At the time of mastectomy, tissue expanders are inserted below the muscle , often with the use of sterile skin matrices for bulk. In the second stage, silicone implants are inserted and, depending on the type of mastectomy, nipple/areola may need to be reconstructed as well.

Soft tissue, or flap reconstruction, is an option for select patients as well. This is a single step procedure usually involving abdominal wall excess. There is some loss of muscle/fascia in order to rebuild the breast with flaps.

Dr. LaTrenta will advise you about which breast reconstruction method will best suit your case.

See article authored by Dr. LaTrenta on Breast Reconstruction.

Best Candidate

A woman who has lost a breast due to cancer or other condition may benefit both physically and emotionally from breast reconstruction surgery. IT IS MANDATORY THAT PATIENTS BE NON-SMOKERS.

Patients with the following have greater risk to themselves with reconstructive surgery:

Previous radiotherapy

Morbid obesity

Multiple previous scars

Generalized medical conditions such as diabetes and hypertension

The Procedure

The two basic reconstruction methods are implants and flaps. Implants are either saline or gel silicone filled prostheses which mimic the substance of the breast. Flaps are developed from the body’s naturally excessive soft tissue (generally taken from the abdomen – a “tummy tuck” bonus.)

Most cases involve implant reconstruction in two stages. At the time of mastectomy, tissue expanders are inserted below the muscle , often with the use of sterile skin matrices for bulk. In the second stage, silicone implants are inserted and, depending on the type of mastectomy, the nipple/areola may need to be reconstructed as well.

Soft tissue, or flap reconstruction, is another option for some patients. This is a single step procedure usually involving abdominal wall excess. There is some loss of muscle/fascia in order to rebuild the breast with flaps.

If only one breast has been affected, a breast lift, breast reduction or breast augmentation may be used on the opposite breast to improve symmetry of the size and position of both breasts.

Please click the “additional information” tab to read an article Dr. LaTrenta wrote on the subject of breast reconstruction.

You may also wish to visit the website of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons for for more details, including risks, of this procedure.

Recovery Time

Recovery time from breast reconstruction surgery varies depending upon the patient and the type of procedure that was used to reconstruct the breast.

However, you should expect it to take at least three to six weeks before you can resume strenuos activity.

You should also consider that follow-up surgeries may be required in order to construct a new areola and nipple.

Dr. LaTrenta advises most patients that it may be a full year before the breast appears completely normal.

General Info

Breast reconstruction surgery involves multiple plastic surgery techniques to restore a breast to its normal shape, appearance and size following mastectomy.

Most cases involve implant reconstruction in two stages. At the time of mastectomy, tissue expanders are inserted below the muscle , often with the use of sterile skin matrices for bulk. In the second stage, silicone implants are inserted and, depending on the type of mastectomy, nipple/areola may need to be reconstructed as well.

Soft tissue, or flap reconstruction, is an option for select patients as well. This is a single step procedure usually involving abdominal wall excess. There is some loss of muscle/fascia in order to rebuild the breast with flaps.

Dr. LaTrenta will advise you about which breast reconstruction method will best suit your case.

See article authored by Dr. LaTrenta on Breast Reconstruction.

Best Candidate

A woman who has lost a breast due to cancer or other condition may benefit both physically and emotionally from breast reconstruction surgery. IT IS MANDATORY THAT PATIENTS BE NON-SMOKERS.

Patients with the following have greater risk to themselves with reconstructive surgery:

Previous radiotherapy

Morbid obesity

Multiple previous scars

Generalized medical conditions such as diabetes and hypertension

The Procedure

The two basic reconstruction methods are implants and flaps. Implants are either saline or gel silicone filled prostheses which mimic the substance of the breast. Flaps are developed from the body’s naturally excessive soft tissue (generally taken from the abdomen – a “tummy tuck” bonus.)

Most cases involve implant reconstruction in two stages. At the time of mastectomy, tissue expanders are inserted below the muscle , often with the use of sterile skin matrices for bulk. In the second stage, silicone implants are inserted and, depending on the type of mastectomy, the nipple/areola may need to be reconstructed as well.

Soft tissue, or flap reconstruction, is another option for some patients. This is a single step procedure usually involving abdominal wall excess. There is some loss of muscle/fascia in order to rebuild the breast with flaps.

If only one breast has been affected, a breast lift, breast reduction or breast augmentation may be used on the opposite breast to improve symmetry of the size and position of both breasts.

Please click the “additional information” tab to read an article Dr. LaTrenta wrote on the subject of breast reconstruction.

You may also wish to visit the website of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons for for more details, including risks, of this procedure.

Recovery Time

Recovery time from breast reconstruction surgery varies depending upon the patient and the type of procedure that was used to reconstruct the breast.

However, you should expect it to take at least three to six weeks before you can resume strenuos activity.

You should also consider that follow-up surgeries may be required in order to construct a new areola and nipple.

Dr. LaTrenta advises most patients that it may be a full year before the breast appears completely normal.

I am a breast cancer survivor of 6 years and a grateful patient of Dr. LaTrenta. He performed my breast reconstruction ‘redo’ surgery 6 months ago and I couldn’t be happier with the results or the experience, which thanks to him and his incredible staff, was great from start to finish. I have read his other positive reviews and it is impossible not to repeat similar themes about him because they ring true. Dr. LaTrenta is everything you want in your surgeon.”

-K.L

I am a breast cancer survivor of 6 years and a grateful patient of Dr. LaTrenta. He performed my breast reconstruction ‘redo’ surgery 6 months ago and I couldn’t be happier with the results or the experience, which thanks to him and his incredible staff, was great from start to finish. I have read his other positive reviews and it is impossible not to repeat similar themes about him because they ring true. Dr. LaTrenta is everything you want in your surgeon.”

-K.L